Military Embedded Systems

Datacryptor's security stays with the times

Product

October 25, 2010

Sharon Hess

Military Embedded Systems

Chris A. Cuifo

Editorial Director

Military Embedded Systems

Datacryptor's security stays with the times

To stay relevant, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has created and adjusted U.S. security policies for cryptographic modules.

To stay relevant, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has created and adjusted U.S. security policies for cryptographic modules. First came the Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS)140-1 Security Requirements for Cryptographic Modules in 1995, superseded by FIPS 140-2, Security Requirements for Cryptographic Modules, in 2001. And with the increase in potential security threats and attacks rising every year, who can blame NIST for mandating these standards for cryptographic modules? One company that has followed NIST’s instructions and policies to a “T” is Thales with its Datacryptor network encryptors: Certified to FIPS 140-2 Level 3, users know networks are ultra-secure. (Level 3, one of four FIPS 140-2 levels, adds the dimension of cryptographic modules’ physical tamper resistance.) Other notables about the Datacryptor optical, high-speed network encryptors are that they work with most any optical vendors’ wares. They also comprise Ethernet Layer 2 in the following versions: 100 Mbps, 1 Gbps, and 10 Gbps. The optical network encryptors are SONET-SDH based (specifically, OC-3/12/48/192 SONET/SDH), and they are best suited to high-speed commercial and government applications. Additionally, they are ideal for LAN extension, network transport, and satellite communications. Sounds like just what the U.S. DoD could use to keep enemies at bay…

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